National Press Club

UNICEF USA CEO joining panel on children in Central African Republic, June 6

May 28, 2019 | By Carmen Russell-Sluchansky | npc@sluchansky.com

NBC correspondent Cynthia McFadden will join a panel to examine challenges facing children in the Central African Republic at a June 6 National Press Club event.

NBC correspondent Cynthia McFadden will join a panel to examine challenges facing children in the Central African Republic at a June 6 National Press Club event.

Caryl Stern, president and chief executive officer of UNICEF USA, plans to join NBC senior legal and investigative correspondent Cynthia McFadden and UN Foundation Vice President Peter Yeo to discuss the challenges children face in the conflict-prone Central African Republic on Thursday, June 6, at 1 p.m. at the National Press Club.

Club members and the public are invited to join Stern, McFadden, and Yeo for a discussion on international reporting and children in the Central African Republic hosted by the Club's International Correspondents Committee. Tickets for the discussion and lunch beginning at 12:30 p.m. are free but RSVP is required.

Stern may be an activist, author, advocate, and nonprofit executive but none of those things are what she originally set out to do.

“I got my bachelor's degree in studio art,” Stern told Business Insider. “My plan was to become a painter.” However, after changing course and obtaining a doctorate in education, she went on to hold leadership positions at colleges and nonprofits including the Anti-Defamation League where she was for 18 years.

In 2006, she started work at UNICEF USA, moving up to chief executive officer and president shortly after. UNICEF USA supports the United Nations Children's Fund’s efforts to protect the health and welfare of children around the world. It is in that role that Stern has crisscrossed the globe investigating challenges children face in places of need including Africa.

Stern plays a starring role in NBC’s recent coverage of children in the Central African Republic, taking NBC’s Cynthia McFadden to hospitals, orphanages and shanty towns. She introduces McFadden to children suffering from disease and malnutrition such as the 7-year old girl who weighs less than 30 pounds or Vincent, a one and a half-year-old who has lost the ability to eat.

“This is the most dangerous place in the world for children,” she tells McFadden, explaining around 1.5 million children in the nation face starvation as a result of conflict. “Two of every three children in this country are in need of humanitarian assistance right now.”