National Press Club

Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post editor Maraniss to discuss blacklisting of his journalist father in book talk, May 17

May 10, 2019 | By Donna Leinwand Leger | Donna@dcmedia.us

Journalist David Maraniss, whose coverage of Bill Clinton as a presidential candidate earned a Pulitzer Prize, will discuss his latest book, “A Good American Family,” at a National Press Club Headliners breakfast on May 17.

Journalist David Maraniss, whose coverage of Bill Clinton as a presidential candidate earned a Pulitzer Prize, will discuss his latest book, “A Good American Family,” at a National Press Club Headliners breakfast on May 17.

Photo/Image: Lucian Perkins

Journalist David Maraniss, whose coverage of Bill Clinton as a presidential candidate earned a Pulitzer Prize, will discuss his latest book, “A Good American Family,” at a National Press Club Headliners breakfast on May 17.

Doors open at 8:30 a.m. with a light breakfast of coffee, tea, muffins and pastries. The program begins promptly at 9 a.m.

Maraniss, an associate editor at The Washington Post, has written 11 books, including biographies of Barack Obama, Vince Lombardi, Al Gore and Roberto Clemente. In his twelfth book, he turns his journalist’s eye on his own family.

To reserve your ticket, click here.

In “A Good American Family,” Maraniss ask what it means to be American. Through his own family’s story — the story of his father, Elliott, a newspaper reporter who was hauled in to testify before the the House Un-American Activities Committee in 1952 — he looks at the fear and paranoia that overtook liberty during the Red Scare of the 1950s.

To attend this Headliners book event, you must have a ticket. Tickets cost $5 for Club members and $15 for non-members. When purchasing your tickets online, you will also have the option of buying a book. Books will be available for pick up and signing at the event. You may also purchase a copy of the book at the event.

Proceeds from the book sales will benefit the National Press Club Journalism Institute, the non-profit affiliate of the Club, so the Institute asks that you leave all outside books at home.